The Vienna Gambit, by Derparnieux


The Vienna System is an opening with the white pieces that starts with the moves 1. e4 e5 2. Nc3. From this point, black can play the move Nf6, and white has the option to play a wonderful gambit known as the Vienna Gambit, which is the move f4. This move directly challenges black's center pawn. If black does not respond correctly, the Vienna Gambit can lead to a devastating attack on black's position. In this guide, I will cover the most common responses that you will see to this gambit, and will also tell you how you should play against this gambit.

42b1577807336b3cc1b8ea11155bef74.png


1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 exf4

...

22f63ba0b0faacff073bf332ea62e3f7.png


...

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 Nc6

...

8f58a46a3ad7aacc87b604d84a8e0f69.png


...

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 Bd6

...

7a42583ccc41961789f051888222ec69.png


...

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d6

The best way to decline the gambit while protecting the center pawn on e5 is to play the move d6. It should be noted that, although this is not the best response to the Vienna Gambit, it is an okay response. The main drawback of this move is the fact that black's dark-squared bishop is now locked in a prison of its own pawns.

65d36b985c765e5928924f75ebaaa085.png


...

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d5

Striking back in the center with the move d5 is actually the most critical response for black against the Vienna Gambit. In my opinion, this is why the Vienna Gambit is such a great gambit; most players you will face at the lower end of the rating ladder will not be prepared with this move, and so they will very likely not know how to respond to the Vienna Gambit. However, you should still know what to do against a prepared opponent.

4288c11cc6cf1588874e3e199357266f.png


...

Other responses

...